Why Motown the Musical is not to be missed

0

Sponsored

Hull New Theatre allowed me to tick off an entry on my “want to see list” this week. I was invited to watch Motown the Musical which is at Hull New Theatre until Saturday 6th July and it is a show not to be missed.

I grew up in the 60’s and the Motown sound highly influenced my childhood. Stars like Diana Ross and the Supremes, Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder, and The Jackson 5 was music I danced to at the local youth club on Cottingham Road.
The show is the story of the founder of Motown, Berry Gordy, who founded a record label for black artistes to represent them and to have their musical played on the radio. He was having problems getting music played and recognised they needed their own labels. It was not just a label, he brought in songwriters and dance teachers to develop the groups and get the hits out. Did you know he started the label with an $800 loan from the family?  What a legacy that $800 grew into.
There was lots of singing and dancing (my kind of show) and to watch the routines of the 4 Tops, Temptations and Supremes took me right back. The co-ordination of the singers/dancers was spot on, as I recalled Saturday night shows with these guest appearances and being wowed by the routines. As a child they looked so complicated, as a former dancer I knew they were simple but well choreographed, rehearsed and performed.
Every so often, I see a show and I get costume envy. Motown does not just have great costumes for the ladies, but the guys were also smartly dressed and the costumes sparkled and rippled as they moved. Even as the show left the 50’s and moved into the 60’s music scene and the sparkle gave way to psychedelic patterns I wanted the costumes. They were fabulous.
This show was not just about the music. It relayed the 60’s; the death of President Kennedy and how it affected the community, and Dr Martin Luther King’s speech and the rallies of the era were represented. It was shocking to recall that today’s freedom for artistes of colour was fought for by the earlier generation, who ran the gauntlet of America’s form of Apartheid at night clubs, and the Ku Klux Klan who did not want white people to mix with blacks or listen to their music.
This is a fabulous cast. The voices were so clear and the singing so beautiful. I could listen to Berry Gordy (Edward Baruwa) all night, his voice was so smooth and silky; like melting chocolate. Karis Anderson as Diana Ross was fantastic, sparkly and a diva, and a special shout out to the youngest member of the cast who played young Berry, Stevie and Michael. When he was singing the Jackson 5 songs, he sounded just like Michael Jackson. He got a fabulous cheer each time he appeared on stage and at curtain call, surely a star of the future.
This is a slick show, The music is familiar and exciting and the audience were joining in, dancing in their seats, singing along loudly (when encouraged) and I am not apologising to the ladies sat in front of me for singing loudly.
There are still tickets left so grab one, put your glam on and get to the New Theatre and see this uplifting show. I was singing Motown all the way home, ok I am STILL singing Motown, I loved the show and so will you. Tickets are from £19 and worth every penny.
Interested

Sponsored